Steering Committeea

Elena Babenko

St Petersburg, Russian Federation

Elena Babenko

St Petersburg, Russian Federation

Elena Babenko graduated from the Leningrad State Medical Institute in 1991 before working on stem cell graft estimation and cryopreservation at the University of Hamburg in Hamburg, Germany. Since then she has worked in Austria, Italy and Norway, specialising in cell selection and flow cytometry.

She is currently head of the cryopreservation department at the Raisa Gorbacheva Memorial Institute of Children’s Oncology, Hematology and Transplantation at Pavlov First Saint Petersburg State Medical University.

Bernard Chatelain

Namur, Belgium

Bernard Chatelain

Namur, Belgium

Bernard Chatelain is currently head of the haematology laboratory at the Catholic University of Louvain (UCL) Namur in Belgium and is in charge of teaching at UCL Louvain and the University of Namur. Professor Chatelain previously studied and specialised in clinical biology at UCL.

Professor Chatelain is a member of various international and Belgian scientific societies, such as the following flow cytometry societies: ISAC, ESCCA, AFC and ABC, as well as societies dedicated to haematology and haemostasis, including GEHT, SFH, ASH and EHA. Professor Chatelain is also a board member of GFHC (France) and is a founding member of NTHC U Namur (Namur Thrombosis and Haemostasis Center). For several years, Professor Chatelain has been a member of the expert committee in haematology, haemostasis and cytometry for ISP (Institut de Santé Publique Belgique). Recently, he has contributed to the European project Raman microscopy in haematology.

Professor Chatelain’s main interests include microvesicles in haemostasis, PNH and immunophenotyping of haematological malignancies.

Luigi Del Vecchio

Naples, Italy

Luigi Del Vecchio

Naples, Italy

Luigi Del Vecchio is currently associate professor of clinical biochemistry and head of the Laboratory of Clinical and Experimental Cytometry at the University of Naples Federico II and CEINGE Institute in Naples, Italy. Prior to this, he held the position of head of cellular immunology at the Division of Immunohematology and Transfusion Medicine at Antonio Cardarelli Hospital in Naples from 1994-2005.

Dr Del Vecchio has extensive experience in flow cytometric analysis, specialising in its application for the characterisation of mesenchymal stem cells and haematological precursors, in addition to its use for the detection of new markers of haematopoietic precursors and PNH clones.

Bernard Drénou

Mulhouse, France

Bernard Drénou

Mulhouse, France

Bernard Drénou is currently head of the haematology department at Mulhouse Hospital in France. He received his clinical training at the University of Rennes in Rennes, France, where he studied medicine and biology simultaneously. Dr Drénou’s main interests include characterisation of immune escape and cell signalling in lymphomas.

Dr Drénou’s collaborative work with the INSERM Human Immunogenetics Laboratory has led to the characterisation of HLA-DR-induced cell death on antigen-presenting cells as a non-caspase-dependent mechanism. He has also developed flow cytometry approaches in immunophenotyping and research. Recently, Dr Drénou co-organised an international workshop (France and Belgium) to promote the use of flow cytometry in PNH diagnosis according to international guidelines.

Andrea Illingworth

Bangor, Maine, USA

Andrea Illingworth

Bangor, Maine, USA

After graduating in 1982, Andrea Illingworth worked for the Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nürnberg in Erlangen, Germany, as a research assistant in pheromone research until 1985. She then moved to South Africa and worked in equine and human laboratories until she joined the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg in 1986, where she initiated the flow cytometry division of the university, working with the South African Institute for Medical Research. In 1987 she moved to Bangor, Maine, USA, to start the flow cytometry division of Dahl-Chase Diagnostic Services, where she is now the operational director.

As part of Ms Illingworth’s duties, the Dahl-Chase Diagnostic Services division has been actively involved in several national and multinational clinical trials in patients with PNH. In addition to testing the effects of the drug on patients with PNH, the laboratory has also been testing >6000 patients (EXPLORE study) to determine the significance of these PNH clones often found in other more common disorders such as aplastic anaemia, myelodysplasia and other bone marrow failures. As a result of Ms Illingworth’s extensive experience in testing for this rare disease, Dahl-Chase has been cited as a ‘Center of Excellence’ for its work.

Salem Khalil

Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

Salem Khalil

Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

Salem Khalil is a consultant haematopathologist at the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, where he is also deputy chairman and section head for cryptogenetic and molecular genetics. He is clinical assistant professor at King Saud University and assistant professor at Alfaisal University, both in Riyadh.

Professor Khalil has almost 30 years of experience, has published over 40 articles as an author or co-author and is a member of the editorial board for the Journal of Applied Hematology. He is a member of the executive board of the Saudi Scientific Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation and of the Center of Excellence of Osteoporosis Research, and is a member of several international organisations including the American Society for Clinical Pathology and the International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. His current research interests lie in molecular haematology and flow cytometry.

Iuri Marinov

Prague, Czech Republic

Iuri Marinov

Prague, Czech Republic

Iuri Marinov is a graduate of the Faculty of Medicine at Sofia University in Sofia, Bulgaria. He completed his postgraduate study at the Institute of Haematology and Blood Transfusion in Prague, Czech Republic, with a thesis on practical application of monoclonal antibodies in haematology (immunophenotyping and immunodiagnosis of blood malignancies).

Since 1994, Dr Marinov has worked as a research scientist at the Institute of Haematology and Blood Transfusion. His main area of research interest is immunophenotyping of acute, chronic leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndromes.

Dr Marinov is head of the flow cytometry unit and has a medical attestation in internal medicine 1st degree and a medical attestation in haematology and transfusion medicine. He is a member of the Czech Society of Haematology, the European Society of Clinical Cell Analysis (ESCCA), the International Clinical Cytometry Society (ISCCS) and the diagnostic platform of European LeukemiaNet.

Thomas Matthes

Geneva, Switzerland

Thomas Matthes

Geneva, Switzerland

Thomas Matthes is ‘privatdozent’ in the Department of Hematology at the University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland. He studied medicine at the University of Ulm in Germany and the Universities of Lausanne and Geneva in Switzerland. After obtaining his doctorate, he spent 3 years at the Pasteur Institute in Paris, France, before specialising in internal medicine and later in haematology. Since 2003 he has held a senior position (‘médecin adjoint’) at the Department of Hematology and is responsible for both the Flow Cytometry Laboratory and the Molecular Biology Laboratory at Geneva University Hospital.

Dr Matthes’ scientific work focuses on the role of adhesion molecules in the pathophysiology of lymphoproliferative syndromes and on the development of new biomarkers for the diagnosis of these diseases. In 2012 he created the Swiss Flow Cytometry School, which serves as a teaching institute for all professionals seeking to learn or to improve their understanding of flow cytometry.

Alberto Orfao

Salamanca, Spain

Alberto Orfao

Salamanca, Spain

Alberto Orfao is professor of immunology and director of the General Cytometry Service at the University of Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain, as well as a principal investigator at the Cancer Research Center of Salamanca. He has led the Spanish National DNA Bank since its creation in 2004. His clinical research activities are focused on haematological malignancies and the relationship between the immune system and cancer.

Dr Orfao was president of the Iberian Society of Cytometry from 1995 to 1999 and president of the standardisation committee on clinical flow cytometry for the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry from 1994 to 1997. He is co-chair of the EuroFlow Consortium, a scientific working group of the European Haematology Association. He is a member of the European group for the immunological characterisation of leukaemias and actively participates in the Spanish cooperative group for the treatment of haematological malignancies.

Frank Preijers

Nijmegen, the Netherlands

Frank Preijers

Nijmegen, the Netherlands

Frank Preijers is stem cell laboratory director and head of flow cytometric immunophenotyping at the Radboud University Medical Centre, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. He gained his PhD in immunology in 1989, was registered as an immunologist in 1991 and became assistant professor of flow cytometry in 1993.

Dr Preijers' scientific interests include laboratory haematology and cellular immunotherapy, and he is an author on more than 120 peer-reviewed publications in these fields. He is co-founder of the Dutch Society for Cytometry and the Dutch working group for Stem Cell Laboratories and councillor of the European Society for Clinical Cell Analysis (ESCCA).

D. Robert Sutherland

Toronto, Canada

D. Robert Sutherland

Toronto, Canada

Robert Sutherland is professor in the Department of Medicine at the University of Toronto, Canada. He is also technical director of the University Health Network Clinical Flow Cytometry Facility to the Clinical Flow Cytometry Laboratory at Toronto General Hospital.

Professor Sutherland obtained a master’s degree in biochemistry from the University of London, UK, in 1975 while working with Dr Mel Greaves at the Imperial Cancer Research Fund. In 1984, he joined Toronto General Hospital, becoming an assistant professor in 1989 in the Department of Medicine, University of Toronto. In 1997, he became an associate professor and then full professor in 2009.

His research interests include elucidating the structural characteristics of a variety of cell surface molecules associated with normal and malignant cellular phenotypes. His work on CD34 led to the development of a new flow cytometric method to enumerate the CD34+ cells. In 1996, this was used to develop the clinical guideline for the International Society for Hematotherapy and Graft Engineering (ISHAGE). Thanks to this work, Professor Sutherland received the Wallace H. Coulter Distinguished Lecture Award in 2006 “to recognise his lifetime contribution to the science, education and practice of clinical cytometry”.

As part of his work as technical director at the Clinical Flow Cytometry Laboratory at Toronto General Hospital, he and his colleagues developed a number of clinical flow cytometric assays for the detection of glycolphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-linked structures that are lacking in PNH and related disorders like aplastic anaemia. He co-authored the International Clinical Cytometry Society (ICCS) guidelines for the diagnosis of this rare disease by flow cytometry and, subsequently, the more technically focused ‘Practical Guidelines’ for high-sensitivity detection of PNH clones. Most recently, he has pioneered the use of CD157, a GPI-linked structure to simultaneously detect PNH clones in both granulocyte and monocyte lineages.

Professor Sutherland is a member of the Canadian Blood and Marrow Transplant Group laboratory committee and has served on the council of ICCS. He has published over 90 peer-reviewed articles, 14 reviews, nine editorials and 11 technical monographs.

Orianne Wagner-Ballon

Paris, France

Orianne Wagner-Ballon

Paris, France

Orianne Wagner-Ballon is currently associate professor in the haematology and immunology department of Henri Mondor Hospital (Créteil). Dr Wagner-Ballon is head of the cellular haematology and flow cytometry unit. For a period of time, Dr Wagner-Ballon worked at the Gustave Roussy Institute (Villejuif) on myeloproliferative disorders as a post-graduate student and thereafter on chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia.

Her main area of research interest is immunophenotyping of acute leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndromes with a recent characterisation of immunophenotypic signature in chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia. Recently, Dr Wagner-Ballon co-organised an evaluation of PNH screening by flow cytometry through multicentric, interlaboratory comparison in four French-speaking countries.


aThe Steering Committee consulted on and provided input to the content of this website. Some of the members of the Steering Committee have received compensation from Alexion for their input to this website and may also have received fees from Alexion for other activities, including participation in advisory boards and promotional speaker programs.